U.S. President John F. Kennedy and his wife Jacqueline visited Canada in the spring of 1961 to help form a stronger alliance with their northern neighbour during the Cold War era.
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U.S. President John F. Kennedy and his wife Jacqueline visited Canada in the spring of 1961 to help form a stronger alliance with their northern neighbour during the Cold War era.
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U.S. President John F. Kennedy and his wife Jacqueline visited Canada in the spring of 1961 to help form a stronger alliance with their northern neighbour during the Cold War era.


These photographs by Mark Shaw, never used,  were taken during the Bay of Pigs disaster in 1961.  The President later commented that he had decided not to release them. ‘I looked too serious.’  It was a grim, tense day, but he brought none of this to the top floor of the White House.  Afterward he had lunch, a sandwich and fruit on a small tray.  He made no mention of the cause and reason for his quiet.
Zoom Info

These photographs by Mark Shaw, never used,  were taken during the Bay of Pigs disaster in 1961.  The President later commented that he had decided not to release them. ‘I looked too serious.’  It was a grim, tense day, but he brought none of this to the top floor of the White House.  Afterward he had lunch, a sandwich and fruit on a small tray.  He made no mention of the cause and reason for his quiet.
Zoom Info

These photographs by Mark Shaw, never used,  were taken during the Bay of Pigs disaster in 1961.  The President later commented that he had decided not to release them. ‘I looked too serious.’  It was a grim, tense day, but he brought none of this to the top floor of the White House.  Afterward he had lunch, a sandwich and fruit on a small tray.  He made no mention of the cause and reason for his quiet.
Zoom Info

These photographs by Mark Shaw, never used,  were taken during the Bay of Pigs disaster in 1961.  The President later commented that he had decided not to release them. ‘I looked too serious.’  It was a grim, tense day, but he brought none of this to the top floor of the White House.  Afterward he had lunch, a sandwich and fruit on a small tray.  He made no mention of the cause and reason for his quiet.
Zoom Info

These photographs by Mark Shaw, never used,  were taken during the Bay of Pigs disaster in 1961.  The President later commented that he had decided not to release them. ‘I looked too serious.’  It was a grim, tense day, but he brought none of this to the top floor of the White House.  Afterward he had lunch, a sandwich and fruit on a small tray.  He made no mention of the cause and reason for his quiet.
Zoom Info

These photographs by Mark Shaw, never used,  were taken during the Bay of Pigs disaster in 1961.  The President later commented that he had decided not to release them. ‘I looked too serious.’  It was a grim, tense day, but he brought none of this to the top floor of the White House.  Afterward he had lunch, a sandwich and fruit on a small tray.  He made no mention of the cause and reason for his quiet.
Zoom Info
These photographs by Mark Shaw, never used,  were taken during the Bay of Pigs disaster in 1961.  The President later commented that he had decided not to release them. ‘I looked too serious.’  It was a grim, tense day, but he brought none of this to the top floor of the White House.  Afterward he had lunch, a sandwich and fruit on a small tray.  He made no mention of the cause and reason for his quiet.

thekennedywives:

"She was a gutsy mother, very gutsy. That’s the thing I admired in her the most. Everything in life is priorities. Her children were her first major priority." - Photographer Peter Beard.

thekennedywives:

"She was a gutsy mother, very gutsy. That’s the thing I admired in her the most. Everything in life is priorities. Her children were her first major priority." - Photographer Peter Beard.


On August 7, not quite eight months pregnant and feeling unexpected labor pains, Jackie telephoned for medical help from the Hyannis Port house and was rushed by helicopter to the Otis Air Force Base hospital in Falmouth. There, shortly after noon, Patrick Bouvier Kennedy was born cesarean section. Bobby telephoned me the following night to report that the infant was in critical condition and that I better get to Otis. At around four the next morning, before being able to leave, Dave Powers called me with the news that Patrick had died. The cause was hyaline membrane disease, better known today as respiratory distress syndrome.
Jack met me at the hospital. On our way to Jackie’s room, he emphasized the importance of keeping his wife’s spirits up. I stayed with the two of them for an hour. It was evident that each was trying to bolster the spirits of the other.
Jack kept stoic about his loss, but those of us close to him could see how he suffered. When he and Jackie returned to the Cape, Jack invited me over for a swim. He had John Jr. with him, and as we swam and then walked on the beach, Jack was absorbed in everything that his small son was doing. In the few months left to him, my brother showed an even greater preoccupation with the activities of his son and daughter than I had seen before. And he was concerned for Jackie, who took the loss as a tremendous blow. Over these few months of diplomatic crisis, pivotal legislation, and cross-country travel, Jack’s greatest concern was for his wife’s and children’s welfare. 
-Edward M. Kennedy (True Compass)  

On August 7, not quite eight months pregnant and feeling unexpected labor pains, Jackie telephoned for medical help from the Hyannis Port house and was rushed by helicopter to the Otis Air Force Base hospital in Falmouth. There, shortly after noon, Patrick Bouvier Kennedy was born cesarean section. Bobby telephoned me the following night to report that the infant was in critical condition and that I better get to Otis. At around four the next morning, before being able to leave, Dave Powers called me with the news that Patrick had died. The cause was hyaline membrane disease, better known today as respiratory distress syndrome.

Jack met me at the hospital. On our way to Jackie’s room, he emphasized the importance of keeping his wife’s spirits up. I stayed with the two of them for an hour. It was evident that each was trying to bolster the spirits of the other.

Jack kept stoic about his loss, but those of us close to him could see how he suffered. When he and Jackie returned to the Cape, Jack invited me over for a swim. He had John Jr. with him, and as we swam and then walked on the beach, Jack was absorbed in everything that his small son was doing. In the few months left to him, my brother showed an even greater preoccupation with the activities of his son and daughter than I had seen before. And he was concerned for Jackie, who took the loss as a tremendous blow. Over these few months of diplomatic crisis, pivotal legislation, and cross-country travel, Jack’s greatest concern was for his wife’s and children’s welfare. 

-Edward M. Kennedy (True Compass)